Why people with autism shouldn’t feel disabled

There are these things called ‘Social Stories,’ which are designed to help people with autism understand how they might offend others. I think these social stories should be used to explain to the people who get offended, who I call empathics who suffer from empathism, why they are making themselves disabled by lacking relationship skills – let’s call them ‘Relationship Stories’ in this case.

You did very well – Part 1

Empathic to Autistic: You did every well with your speech.

Autistic: Yes, I know, I thought I was good.

Empathic: [Offended]

You did not do your best – Part 1

Autistic to Empathic: I didn’t think that was the best speech you’ve ever done.

Empathic: [Offended]

You did not do your best – Part 2

Empathic to Autistic : I don’t think that was the best speech you’ve ever done.

Autistic: I thought it was the best one ever.

Empathic: [Offended]

You did very well – Part 2

Autistic to Empathic: I think that was the best speech you’ve ever done.

Empathic: It wasn’t that good.

Autistic: You could be right.

Empathic: [Offended]

Question: Who is the most disabled?

Is it the autistic person with a ‘physical or mental impairment that has an adverse long term impact on their ability to carry out normal day to day activities‘ or is it the empathic? Should autistic people be ostracised for giving a fair, balanced and accurate account of a situation, rather than be offended at everything anyone says like empathics suffering from empathism do? In all of the situations above, autistic people would not get offended by one another for giving their honest opinion and in fact, the autistic people would be more likely to probe the person giving the feedback empathics find offensive so they know what to do next time.

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